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Research Article
13 April 2020

Interleukin-8 Dedifferentiates Primary Human Luminal Cells to Multipotent Stem Cells

ABSTRACT

During aging, cellular plasticity and senescence play important roles in tissue regeneration and the pathogenesis of different diseases, including cancer. We have recently shown that senescent breast luminal cells can activate their adjacent stromal fibroblasts. In the present report, we present clear evidence that these senescence-related active fibroblasts can dedifferentiate proliferating primary human luminal cells to multipotent stem cells in an interleukin-8 (IL-8)-dependent manner. This was confirmed using recombinant IL-8, while the truncated protein was not active. This IL-8-related dedifferentiation of luminal cells was mediated through the STAT3-dependent downregulation of p16INK4A and the microRNA miR-141. Importantly, these in vitro-generated mammary stem cells exhibited high molecular and cellular similarities to human mammary stem cells. They have also shown a long-term mammary gland-reconstituting ability and the capacity to produce milk postdelivery. Thereby, these IL-8-generated mammary stem cells could be of great value for autologous cell therapy procedures and also for biomedical research as well as drug development.

INTRODUCTION

The mammary gland is a complex organ composed of various types of cells organized in different functional tissues. The mammary epithelium contains two major types of cells, luminal and myoepithelial cells. In addition to these terminally differentiated cell lineages, cell-tracing experiments have shown the presence of unipotent as well as multipotent stem cells, which can give rise to both luminal and myoepithelial cells (1, 2). This hierarchical organization could be seriously affected in response to various stresses or diseases. The well-known one is the procarcinogenic aging process, during which there is an accumulation of senescent cells, known to have proinflammatory and -tumorigenic paracrine effects mediated through the secretion of various cytokines and growth factors (35). Indeed, several lines of evidence indicated the presence of age-dependent accumulation of multipotent progenitor cells with a decline in function and alteration in the luminal-to-basal cell ratio (6, 7). Moreover, senescence promoted cellular reprogramming in vivo through the secretion of high levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) (8, 9). The plasticity of somatic cells is a very important and complex physiological process with implications for organismal rejuvenation, tissue regeneration, and disease (10, 11). This cellular reprogramming is genetically programmed and is also promoted through paracrine effects from the microenvironment comprising the surrounding cells.
We have recently shown that senescent breast luminal cells can activate their adjacent stromal fibroblasts in an IL-8-dependent manner (12). IL-8, a key senescence and inflammatory cytokine, is a very important cell-cell signaling transmitter with potent reprogramming capacities (13). Active fibroblasts are known to have potent procarcinogenic activities through paracrine signaling (14). Therefore, in the present study, we sought to investigate the effects of these senescence-related active fibroblasts on their breast luminal cells. We show that these active fibroblasts dedifferentiate luminal cells to multipotent mammary stem cells in an IL-8-dependent manner. This effect is mediated through STAT3 activation and the microRNA (miRNA) miR-141 downregulation. These IL-8-generated mammary stem cells were able to generate active mammary glands in mice.

RESULTS

Active breast stromal fibroblasts trigger stemness properties in luminal cells in an IL-8-dependent fashion.

We have recently shown that while senescent human breast luminal cells can transactivate stromal fibroblasts (senescent luminal cell-activated fibroblasts [SLAF]), young proliferative luminal cells had only minimal effects on these fibroblastic cells (young luminal cell-activated fibroblasts [YLAF]) (12). Since active fibroblasts are known to have strong procarcinogenic paracrine effects, we sought to investigate these effects on breast normal primary luminal cells in order to shed more light on cell-cell cross talk during the complex aging process. To this end, normal primary human breast luminal cells (NBL-10), purified as previously described (12), were incubated for 24 h in serum-free conditioned medium (SFCM) from SLAF (SLAF-SFCM) or their corresponding control cells (YLAF), while serum-free medium (SFM) was used as a negative control. Figure 1A shows clear increases in the proliferation rates as well as the migration/invasion abilities of NBL-10 cells exposed to SFCM from SLAF cells compared to SFCM from YLAF, which had an effect similar to that of SFM.
FIG 1
FIG 1 Active stromal fibroblasts induce EMT and stemness properties in normal breast luminal cells. Exponentially growing NBL-10 cells were exposed to SFM or SFCM from the indicated fibroblasts for 24 h. (A) Cells were collected and utilized to assess the proliferation rate and migration/invasion capacities using the RTCA-DP-xCELLigence system. Data are representative of results from different experiments performed in triplicate. (B) Whole-cell lysates were prepared from NBL-10 cells treated as indicated and then used for immunoblot analysis. (C) IL-8-activated fibroblasts induce EMT and stemness properties in normal breast luminal cells. Exponentially growing NBL-10 cells were exposed to SFM or SFCM from the indicated fibroblasts for 24 h. Whole-cell lysates were prepared and used to assess the level of the indicated proteins by immunoblotting. The numbers below the bands indicate the corresponding expression levels after loading correction against GAPDH.
Next, we investigated the possible induction of mesenchymal features in luminal cells upon exposure to SFCM from SLAF cells. Indeed, the immunoblot analysis shows a strong decrease in the epithelial markers E-cadherin and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), while the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, vimentin, Twist1, ZEB1, Snail, and Slug were upregulated in cells that were exposed to SLAF-SFCM compared to YLAF-SFCM and SFM (Fig. 1B). Similar results were obtained with SFCM from IL-8-activated stromal fibroblasts (ILAF) (Fig. 1B). Similar findings were also obtained when NBL-10 cells were exposed to SFCM from 3 different IL-8-activated breast stromal fibroblasts (NBF-20, NBF-21, and NBF-34) (Fig. 1C). This indicates that active breast stromal fibroblasts trigger epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast luminal cells in a paracrine manner.
Since the EMT is a transition phase toward stemness and because links exist between the EMT and certain properties of mammary stem cells (MaSC) (1517), we investigated this possibility in response to SFCM from SLAF and ILAF. Figure 1B shows a clear decrease in CD24, while CD44 and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1/2 (ALDH1/2) were upregulated compared to their levels in luminal cells treated with YLAF-SFCM or SFM. Similarly, the levels of the stemness transcription factors BMI-1, OCT-4, and KLF-4 were also strongly increased in NBL-10 cells exposed to SLAF-SFCM and ILAF-SFCM compared to their respective controls (Fig. 1B). This suggests the possible induction of stemness in breast luminal cells exposed to SFCM from active breast stromal fibroblasts.

Active breast stromal fibroblasts and IL-8 dedifferentiate luminal cells to multipotent mammary stem cells.

To confirm the stemness of luminal cells that were exposed to SFCM from SLAF and ILAF, single NBL-10 cells were cultured in suspension in the presence of stem cell-specific culture medium. Figure 2A shows the formation of typical hollow mammospheres within 2 days of culture, with a self-renewal capacity that has been lost over time with passaging (Fig. 2B). Figure 2B also shows that 45 and 47 mammospheres were formed from 1,000 single cells that were pretreated with ILAF and SLAF, respectively. This indicates that the dedifferentiation efficiencies reached 4.5% and 4.7%, respectively. Next, we tested for the presence of some mammosphere-specific markers and found that the spheres were positive for cytokeratin 18 (CK18) and CK14 (Fig. 2C). This indicates the presence of biprogenitor features in these cells. To confirm this, we investigated the surface markers by flow cytometry and found that exposure of luminal cells to ILAF-SFCM and SLAF-SFCM increased the proportion of EpCAMlow/CD49fhigh (a typical marker of mammary stem cells) compared to control (SFM) cells (Fig. 2D). Interestingly, these cells also exhibited a high and exponential proliferative capacity as well as high telomerase activity when grown as a monolayer (Fig. 2E and F). To further confirm the stemlike nature of these cells, we assessed their differentiation capacity. To this end, freshly obtained mammospheres were plated on gelatin for 1 week, and they were then characterized by flow cytometry and immunostaining. Figure 3A shows the presence of cells with luminal (red arrows) and myoepithelial (green arrows) shapes. These cells stained positive for the myoepithelial marker (CK14), the luminal marker (CK19), or both, with a lower proportion of cells that were positive for both (Fig. 3B). This indicates the ability of these mammospheres to differentiate into specialized cells, namely, luminal and myoepithelial cells, in addition to some bipotent cells. This was confirmed by flow cytometry analysis, which also showed 2 different cell populations: one population exhibited myoepithelial features (EpCAMlow CD49fhigh CD10+ Muc1), while the other one showed luminal characteristics (EpCAMhigh CD49flow CD10 Muc1+) (Fig. 3C). Next, we tested the branching capacities of the SLAF- and ILAF-treated luminal cells. To this end, single cells from mammospheres were first differentiated and then covered with Matrigel containing prolactin. Figure 3D shows three-dimensional (3D) branching structures of both SLAF- and ILAF-treated luminal cells. Importantly, the SLAF- and ILAF-related generation of mammospheres, but not SFM-treated luminal cells, reconstituted cleared mammary fat pads upon transplantation into female SCID mice (Fig. 3E). After resection of mammary outgrowth, whole-mount analysis showed the generation of mammary ductal trees with distal-end buds only in the branching epithelia formed with ILAF- and SLAF-related mammospheres but not in the control (SFM) (Fig. 3E). Similar branching structures were also found in mouse fat pads (Fig. 3E). Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histology showed clear mammary ducts surrounded by adipose tissue in ILAF- and SLAF-related fat pads but in not the control one (Fig. 3E). Next, the human nature of the formed ducts was confirmed by immunostaining using specific anti-human anti-EpCAM and anti-CK18 antibodies. Interestingly, while the SLAF-related ducts were positively stained, mouse ducts were negative for this staining (Fig. 3E and F), which confirmed that the formed ducts originated from the implanted cells.
FIG 2
FIG 2 Active breast stromal fibroblasts dedifferentiate luminal cells to multipotent stem cells. (A) Attached NBL-10 cells were treated with SLAF-SFCM for 24 h, subcultured in growing medium for a week, and then transferred to ultra-low-attachment plates. Images show hollow mammospheres formed 2 days after in-suspension culture. Bar, 50 μm. (B) SLAF- and ILAF-generated mammospheres were digested, 1,000 single cells were cultured in ultra-low-attachment 96-well plates in triplicate, and the newly formed mammospheres were counted and plotted as means ± SD. This was repeated 5 times. (C) SLAF-generated mammospheres were cytospun, fixed, and utilized for immunofluorescence analysis using the indicated antibodies. Representative images are shown. Bars, 50 μm. (D) Mammospheres were generated as indicated above, digested, and analyzed by flow cytometry. Representative dot plots show the phenotypes of the mammospheres obtained after treatment with the indicated media. (E) Mammospheres were digested to single cells, and 1,000 cells were seeded onto 96-well plates for 1 week and then counted. This process was repeated several times. Error bars represent means ± SD. (F) Cell extracts from the indicated cells and mammospheres were either sham treated or heated and amplified by PCR using the TeloTAGGG telomerase PCR ELISA (Roche). The PCR products were hybridized to antidigoxigenin-peroxidase, ELISA reactions were performed, and the OD was then measured at 450 nm using a standard ELISA plate reader (x-Mark; Bio-Rad). These experiments were performed in triplicates.
FIG 3
FIG 3 SLAF- and ILAF-generated mammospheres can be differentiated into both luminal and myoepithelial cells. (A) SLAF-generated mammospheres were digested into single cells, seeded for a week onto 0.1% gelatin-coated plates to allow differentiation, and photographed using a Floid cell imaging station. Red arrows point to luminal cells, while green arrows point to myoepithelial cells. Bar, 40 μm. (B) Immunofluorescence assay for differentiated SLAF-generated mammospheres using the indicated antibodies. Images were taken using the Floid cell imaging station. Bars, 40 μm. (C) The mammospheres generated by SLAF- and ILAF-SFCM were digested into single cells, seeded for a week onto 0.1% gelatin-coated plates to allow differentiation, and used to assess the percentages of luminal and myoepithelial cells by flow cytometry. Representative flow cytometry dot plots are shown, where blue dots represent cells with luminal cell features, red dots represent cells with myoepithelial cell features, and the numbers represent the proportions of each cell type. (D) A layer of prolactin-containing Matrigel was added on top of 5-day-differentiated SLAF- or ILAF-generated mammospheres. Complex acinar and branched acinar structures were formed after 3 days and imaged using the Floid cell imaging station. Bars, 100 μm. (E and F) SLAF- and ILAF-generated mammospheres were digested into single cells, and 0.5 × 106 cells were injected into cleared mammary fat pads of 3-week-old female NOD/SCID mice, using SFM-treated cells as a control. At 8 weeks postinjection, the reconstituted fat pads were excised and subjected to carmine whole-mount staining (WMS). Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunohistochemistry (E) as well as immunofluorescence (F) assays were performed on FFPE tissues from reconstituted fat pads using human-specific antibodies against the indicated proteins. A normal mouse fat pad was used as a control. Bars, 25 μm.
We then set out to investigate the possible implication of IL-8 in the dedifferentiation of luminal cells into mammary stem cells. To this end, NBL-10 cells were incubated for 24 h in SFM (used as a negative control), SFM containing IL-8 (2.5 ng/ml), as determined in our previous study (12), or SFCM from ILAF containing either neutralizing anti-IL-8 antibody or IgG (used as a negative control). The immunoblot analysis shows a clear IL-8-dependent decrease in the level of E-cadherin and an increase in the N-cadherin level (Fig. 4A). This effect was partially inhibited by IL-8-specific neutralization (Fig. 4A). Similarly, recombinant IL-8 upregulated the stem cell markers CD44, ALDH, KLF-4, and OCT-4, while CD24 was downregulated (Fig. 4A). On the other hand, neutralizing IL-8 antibody inhibited these effects (Fig. 4A). Flow cytometry analysis showed similar IL-8-related changes in the CD44high/CD24low subpopulation (Fig. 4B). This suggests that IL-8 is responsible, at least partially, for the ILAF-related induction of stemness in breast luminal cells. When these cells were cultured in low-attachment plates in the presence of stem cell medium, mammospheres were formed (Fig. 4C) and were sustained for several generations, indicating their self-renewal capacity, with a dedifferentiation efficiency similar to those obtained with SLAF and ILAF (Fig. 2B). Interestingly, the spheres costained positive for both cytokeratins 14 and 19 (Fig. 5A). To show the biprogenitor nature of these cells, we assessed their differentiation capacity. Figure 4C shows the presence of cells with luminal and myoepithelial shapes. These cells stained positive for the myoepithelial marker (CK14), the luminal marker (CK19), or both, with a lower proportion of cells that were positive for both (Fig. 5B). This indicates the ability of these mammospheres to be differentiated into luminal and myoepithelial cells, in addition to some bipotent cells. Moreover, we observed the differentiation of these IL-8-generated mammospheres into branching structures in Matrigel containing prolactin (Fig. 5C). Importantly, like ILAF and SLAF treatments, IL-8-treated luminal cells reconstituted cleared mammary fat pads upon transplantation into female SCID mice. After resection, whole-mount analysis showed the generation of mammary ductal trees with distal-end buds (Fig. 5D). To confirm the multipotent nature of these mammary stem cells, mammary outgrowths were collected and retransplanted for secondary mammary fat pad reconstitution. Interestingly, 9 out of 9 of such transplantations reconstituted secondary glands and showed typical mammary ductal trees (Fig. 5E). This shows that the primary transplants retained their regenerative potentials through secondary transplants. This indicates that the generated MaSC exhibit a long-term reconstituting ability.
FIG 4
FIG 4 IL-8 dedifferentiates luminal cells to multipotent stem cells. (A) Whole-cell lysates were prepared from NBL-10 cells treated as indicated and were utilized to assess the levels of the indicated proteins by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. The numbers below the bands indicate the corresponding expression levels after loading correction against GAPDH. (B) Luminal cells (NBL-10) were treated as indicated, and the proportions of cells with the stem cell-like phenotype (CD44high/CD24low) were assessed by flow cytometry. Representative flow cytometry dot plots showing the proportions of gated cells are presented. (C) IL-8-generated mammospheres (IL-8-MaSC) were digested into single cells and seeded for a week onto 0.1% gelatin-coated plates to allow for differentiation. Representative images are shown. Bars, 50 μm. NBL-10 cells were treated with IL-8 (2.5 ng/ml) for 24 h and then subcultured in ultra-low-attachment plates for 2 days. (D) IL-8-generated mammospheres were digested, 1,000 single cells were cultured in ultra-low-attachment 96-well plates in triplicate, and the newly formed mammospheres were counted (2nd generation) and plotted as means ± SD. This was repeated 5 times.
FIG 5
FIG 5 IL-8 dedifferentiates luminal cells to multipotent stem cells. (A) Immunofluorescence assay for cytospun IL-8-MaSC mammospheres using antibodies against the indicated proteins. Bars, 25 μm. (B) Immunofluorescence assay for differentiated IL-8-MaSC mammospheres using antibodies against the indicated proteins. Bars, 25 μm. (C) A layer of prolactin-containing Matrigel was added on top of 5-day-differentiated IL-8-MaSC. Complex acinar and branched acinar structures were formed after 3 days and imaged using the Floid cell imaging station. Bar, 100 μm. (D) IL-8-MaSC were digested into single cells, and 0.5 × 106 cells were injected into cleared mammary fat pads of 3-week-old female NOD/SCID mice, using SFM-treated cells as controls. At 8 weeks postinjection, the reconstituted fat pads were excised and subjected to carmine whole-mount staining. (E) IL-8-MaSC-related reconstituted fat pads were digested into single cells, and 0.5 × 106 cells were retransplanted into cleared mammary fat pads of 3-week-old female NOD/SCID mice, using SFM-treated cells as controls. Outgrowths were excised at 8 weeks posttransplantation and subjected to carmine whole-mount staining.
Similar experiments were performed on different breast primary luminal cells, which also generated MaSC. Figure 6A shows that IL-8-dependent treatment of NBL-34 cells also generated mammospheres that stained positive for both cytokeratins 14 and 18 and were differentiated into luminal (cytokeratin 18-positive) and myoepithelial (cytokeratin 14-positive) cells.
FIG 6
FIG 6 IL-8 dedifferentiates luminal cells to multipotent stem cells. (A) NBL-34 cells were cultured in SFM containing IL-8 (2.5 ng/ml) for 24 h and then subcultured in ultra-low-attachment plates for 2 days. A phase-contrast image of hollow mammospheres in suspension culture is shown. (B) IL-8-generated mammospheres were cytospun, fixed, and utilized for immunofluorescence analysis using the indicated antibodies. Representative images are shown. TRITC, tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate. Bars, 40 μm. (C) IL-8-generated mammospheres were digested into single cells, seeded for a week onto 0.1% gelatin-coated plates to allow differentiation, and photographed using the Floid cell imaging station. (D) Immunofluorescence assay for differentiated IL-8-generated mammospheres using the indicated antibodies. Images were taken using the Floid cell imaging station. Bars, 40 μm. (E) IL-8 induces MaSC in 3D culture. NBL-10 cells were seeded at 1 × 106 cells per well prior to exposure to either SFM, SFM containing IL-8 (25 ng/ml), or SFCM from SLAF or ILAF for 24 h. Cultures were maintained in growing medium for 2 weeks. The discs were then fixed in 10% formalin, paraffin embedded, sectioned, and utilized for either hematoxylin and eosin staining or immunofluorescence analysis utilizing the indicated antibodies. Bars, 200 μm. (F) Truncated IL-8 recombinant protein fails to generate MaSC. NBL-10 cells were exposed to SFM or SFM containing either full-length IL-8 or truncated IL-8 (IL-8t) (2.5 ng/ml) for 24 h. Cells were then cultured in MaSC medium for 3 days, and whole-cell lysates were then prepared and utilized to assess the level of the indicated proteins using specific antibodies. (G) Representative phase-contrast images of the indicated cells and mammospheres. Bars, 50 μm. (H) NBL-10 cells were exposed to SFM or SFM containing either full-length IL-8 (2.5 ng/ml) or 2 different concentrations of full-length IL-6 (1 ng/ml [1] and 3.5 ng/ml [3.5]) for 24 h. (Left) Cells were then cultured in MaSC medium for 3 days, and whole-cell lysates were prepared and utilized to assess the levels of the indicated proteins using specific antibodies. (Right) Representative phase-contrast images of the indicated cells. Bars, 50 μm. The numbers below the bands indicate the corresponding expression levels after loading correction against GAPDH.
Interestingly, IL-8 treatment induced MaSC features in luminal cells even when these cells were grown in 3D structures (Fig. 6E). Indeed, SLAF-SFCM, ILAF-SFCM, as well as IL-8 enhanced the proliferative as well as the invasive capacities of luminal cells relative to controls (Fig. 6E, H&E). Furthermore, these treatments enriched for cells positive for both CK14 and CK19 and enhanced the expression of CD44 and ALDH1, while CD24 was downregulated (Fig. 6E).
To confirm this IL-8 dependence in dedifferentiating human luminal cells into MaSC, NBL-10 cells were treated with IL-8 or a truncated form of the protein (IL-8t) (2.5 ng/ml each), while SFM was used as a negative control. Figure 6F shows that while IL-8 promoted EMT and stemness features (upregulation of N-cadherin, CD44, and ALDH and downregulation of E-cadherin and CD24), IL-8t had no effect on these markers. Similarly, while IL-8 treatment generated mammospheres under stem cell growth conditions, no spheres were obtained when NBL-10 was exposed to IL-8t (Fig. 6G). Similar to IL-8t, two different concentrations of IL-6 (1 ng/ml and 3.5 ng/ml) were not able to generate mammospheres under stem cell growth conditions (Fig. 6H, right), although both concentrations increased the level of the mesenchymal and stemness markers (Fig. 6H, left). This shows the importance of active IL-8 in the dedifferentiation process. Together, these results indicate that IL-8 can dedifferentiate human luminal cells into multipotent mammary stem cells.
It is noteworthy that luminal cells were exposed to IL-8 as attached cells under conditions where mammary stem cells do not attach, which, in principle, should remove all potential contaminant MaSC and further support the IL-8-dependent dedifferentiation process.

IL-8-related generation of MaSC is mediated through STAT3 activation and p16/miR-141 downregulation.

In order to delineate the molecular pathway implicated in the IL-8-dependent dedifferentiation of luminal cells into MaSC, we sought to evaluate the role of the STAT3 signaling effect via knocking down the gene using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). Figure 7A shows that IL-8 treatment of luminal cells did not induce EMT and stemness in STAT3-deficient cells relative to controls. Indeed, STAT3 siRNA-1 prevented the upregulation of mesenchymal markers as well as CD44 and ALDH (Fig. 7A). Similar results were obtained when a different STAT3 siRNA was utilized (STAT3 siRNA-2) (Fig. 7B). Specific STAT3 knockdown also suppressed the IL-8-related activation of the proliferation and migration/invasion of luminal cells (Fig. 7C). Consequently, while IL-8-treated control cells formed mammospheres when cultured in ultra-low-attachment flasks, STAT3-deficient cells did not (Fig. 7D). This indicates that IL-8-dependent dedifferentiation of luminal cells into MaSC is mediated through STAT3 signaling.
FIG 7
FIG 7 IL-8-related transformation of luminal cells to MaSC is STAT3 dependent. NBL-10 cells were transfected with STAT3-specific siRNAs (STAT3si-1 and STAT3si-2) or a scrambled sequence used as a control, and cells were then either sham treated or challenged with IL-8 (2.5 ng/ml) for 24 h. (A and B) Whole-cell lysates were prepared from the indicated cells and utilized to assess the levels of the indicated proteins by immunoblotting. The numbers below the bands indicate the corresponding expression levels after loading correction against GAPDH. (C) The migration/invasion as well as proliferation capacities of the indicated cells were assessed using the RTCA-DP-xCELLigence system. (D) The indicated cells were plated in ultra-low-attachment 6-well plates in stem cell medium and monitored daily for mammosphere formation. Representative images are shown. Bars, 50 μm.
To further elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the IL-8-dependent dedifferentiation of luminal cells, we sought to delineate the role of the STAT3 downstream effector miR-141. Therefore, we first tested the effect of IL-8 treatment on miR-141 expression. Figure 8A shows a potent reduction in the level of miR-141. To test the implication of STAT3 in this process, the gene was knocked down in NBL-10 cells by specific siRNA, while a scrambled sequence was used as a control, and the cells were then exposed or not to IL-8. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) confirmed the IL-8-dependent downregulation of miR-141, while STAT3 knockdown enhanced the expression of this microRNA relative to controls (Fig. 8B). Interestingly, exposure of STAT3-deficient cells to IL-8 had only a slight effect on the expression of miR-141 (Fig. 8B). This shows that IL-8-dependent miR-141 downregulation is STAT3 related. Similarly, IL-8 treatment upregulated AUF1 (a direct target of STAT3 [1820]), CD44, and ZEB1 and reduced the level of p16 in control cells (Fig. 8C). However, these IL-8-related effects were suppressed in STAT3-deficient cells (Fig. 8C).
FIG 8
FIG 8 IL-8-dependent induction of MaSC is mediated through p16/miR-141 downregulation. (A) Total RNA was prepared from the indicated cells and utilized to assess the level of mature miR-141 by qRT-PCR. Error bars represent means ± SD, with values from 3 independent experiments. *, P = 0.000114. (B and C) NBL-10 cells transfected with STAT3 siRNA or control siRNA were exposed to SFM or SFM containing IL-8 (2.5 ng/ml) for 24 h. Cells were then collected and utilized to prepare total RNA, and the level of mature miR-141 was assessed by qRT-PCR (B), or cells were utilized to prepare whole-cell lysates, and the levels of the indicated proteins were assessed by immunoblotting (C). (D) NBL-10 cells were transduced with the lentiviral supernatant containing either a control plasmid or a plasmid bearing the CDKN2A open reading frame (ORF). Three days later, cells were exposed to either SFM or SFM containing IL-8 (2.5 ng/ml) for 24 h. After 3 days, cells were collected and utilized to prepare total RNA, and the levels of the indicated transcripts were assessed by qRT-PCR. Error bars represent means ± SD, with values from 3 different experiments. (E) NBL-10 cells were transduced with the lentiviral supernatant containing either a control plasmid or a plasmid bearing pre-miR-141. Three days later, cells were exposed to either SFM or SFM containing IL-8 (2.5 ng/ml) for 24 h. After 3 days, cells were then cytospun and used for immunofluorescence analysis utilizing the indicated antibodies. Bars, 50 μm.
miR-141 is also under the positive control of p16, which is negatively regulated by STAT3 either directly or indirectly through positive regulation of the p16 repressor AUF1 (1820). Therefore, we investigated the implication of p16 in IL-8-dependent miR-141 downregulation in luminal NBL-10 cells. As expected, IL-8 treatment reduced the levels of both the CDKN2A mRNA and miR-141, while it enhanced the downstream effectors CD44 and ZEB1 (Fig. 8D). On the other hand, the ectopic expression of p16 strongly enhanced the level of miR-141 and suppressed IL-8-dependent miR-141 downregulation and the consequent upregulation of CD44 and ZEB1 (Fig. 8D). This indicates that the IL-8 effect on luminal cells is mediated through p16 and its downstream effector miR-141.
To further confirm the importance of miR-141 downregulation in the IL-8-dependent dedifferentiation of luminal cells, we ectopically expressed miR-141 in NBL-10 cells using a plasmid bearing pre-miR-141 or an empty vector used as a control (pre-miR-ctrl), and these cells were then either exposed or not to IL-8 (pre-miR-141-IL-8 and pre-miR-ctrl-IL-8). Figure 8E shows the formation of mammospheres only in control cells treated with IL-8 but not in those expressing miR-141. This was confirmed by immunofluorescence and the expression of cytokeratin 19 and cytokeratin 14 (Fig. 8E). Figure 8 also shows that only pre-miR-ctrl-IL-8 cells expressed the myoepithelial marker cytokeratin 14, which shows the importance of miR-141 downregulation in the IL-8-related dedifferentiation of human luminal cells.
To confirm this at the molecular level, we assessed the levels of several EMT- and stemness-related genes and showed that the ectopic expression of pre-miR-141 inhibited the IL-8-dependent promotion of the EMT and stemness processes (Fig. 9A). To confirm the role of miR-141 in the STAT3-related reprogramming of luminal cells upon treatment with IL-8, miR-141 was inhibited with specific miRZip in both STAT3-deficient cells as well as their corresponding controls, and the cells were then exposed to IL-8. Interestingly, while STAT3 siRNA inhibited the IL-8-dependent promotion of EMT/stemness, the inhibition of miR-141 restored the ability of IL-8 to promote EMT and stemness in STAT3-deficient cells (Fig. 9B). These results were confirmed by showing that while STAT3si-ctrl-IL-8 cells do not form spheres and express only cytokeratin 19, STAT3- and miR-141-deficient cells treated with IL-8 formed spheres, which expressed both cytokeratin 19 and cytokeratin 14 (myoepithelium specific) (Fig. 9C).
FIG 9
FIG 9 IL-8-related generation of MaSC is mediated through STAT3 activation and miR-141 downregulation. (A) Total RNA was prepared from the indicated cells and used to assess the levels of the indicated transcripts by qRT-PCR. Error bars represent means ± SD, with values from 3 different experiments. (B and C) NBL-10 cells transfected with STAT3 siRNA or control siRNA were transduced with the lentiviral supernatant containing a control plasmid or a plasmid bearing miRZip-141. Cells were exposed to SFM or SFM containing IL-8 (2.5 ng/ml) for 24 h and were then collected to prepare whole-cell lysates and utilized for immunoblot analysis (B) (the numbers below the bands indicate the corresponding expression levels after loading correction against GAPDH) or cytospun and utilized for immunofluorescence analysis using the indicated antibodies (C). Bars, 50 μm.
This indicates that miR-141 indeed acts downstream of STAT3 and that its downregulation is a prerequisite for the IL-8-dependent induction of the EMT and stemness processes in human luminal cells.

IL-8-generated MaSC and breast natural MaSC exhibit similar gene expression patterns.

To further characterize the IL-8-generated MaSC (IL-8-MaSC) in vitro, we decided to compare the gene expression pattern in these MaSC with that of breast natural MaSC isolated from human breast tissue obtained postmammoplasty (21). Both MaSC exhibited similar gene expression patterns, with 95% of genes showing similar expression levels, and only 1.67% were upregulated and 3.29% were downregulated in IL-8-MaSC relative to the controls (Fig. 10A, C, and D). Strikingly, gene expression patterns of luminal and myoepithelial cells obtained after differentiation of IL-8-generated MaSC (postdifferentiated luminal [PD-luminal] and PD-myoepithelial, respectively) were identical to those of the original luminal (NBL-10) and myoepithelial (NBM-10) cells, respectively (Fig. 10A). In addition, we analyzed the effect of the IL-8-related dedifferentiation of luminal cells to MaSC on gene expression. We found that 88.6% of the analyzed genes showed similar expression levels between the original luminal cells (NBL-10) and their corresponding derivative MaSC (IL-8-MaSC) (Fig. 10A, E, and F). The upregulated genes represented 3% of the genes, while 8.4% of the genes were downregulated (Fig. 10E and F). Among the important differentially expressed genes, we identified several EMT- and stemness-related genes, such as ZEB1, vimentin, N-cadherin, E-cadherin, EpCAM, CD44, and CD24 (Table 1). These variations in gene expression were confirmed by RT-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR). Indeed, striking differences were observed for vimentin, SNAIL1, N-cadherin, TWIST1, ZEB1, and E-cadherin between NBL-10 and its derivative IL-8-MaSC (Fig. 10B). On the other hand, the expression levels of these genes were identical in both lines of luminal cells, the original line (NBL-10) and those obtained postdifferentiation (PD-luminal) (Fig. 10B).
FIG 10
FIG 10 IL-8-generated MaSC and breast natural MaSC exhibit similar gene expression patterns. (A) Total RNA was prepared from the indicated samples and utilized for microarray global gene expression analysis. Representative scatterplots show the log intensity values. (B) Total RNA was prepared from the indicated cells and utilized to assess the levels of the indicated transcripts by qRT-PCR. Error bars represent means ± SD, with values from 3 independent experiments. (C and E) Venn diagrams showing the percentages of differentially expressed genes between the indicated cells. (D and F) Hierarchical cluster analysis of the indicated samples using the expression data set.
TABLE 1
TABLE 1 List of the most highly differentially expressed EMT and stemness genes in NBL-10 cells versus IL-8-MaSC
Biological functionAffymetrix probe setGene fold changeGene symbolGene descriptiona
EMT212764_at12.94ZEB1Zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1
203603_s_at19.89ZEB2Zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2
213943_at2.26TWIST1Twist family bHLH transcription factor 1
229404_at2.37TWIST2Twist family bHLH transcription factor 2
213139_at8.53SNAI2Snail family zinc finger 2
1555938_x_at8.65VIMVimentin
203440_at89.01CDH2Cadherin 2, type 1, N-cadherin (neuronal)
201131_s_at−3.16CDH1Cadherin 1, type 1, E-cadherin (epithelial)
201839_s_at−8.51EpCAMEpithelial cell adhesion molecule
 
Stemness209772_s_at−23.69CD24CD24 molecule
217523_at4.72CD44CD44 molecule (Indian blood group)
201425_at9.59ALDH2Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 family (mitochondrial)
217791_s_at3.71ALDH18A1Aldehyde dehydrogenase 18 family, member A1
208951_at3.61ALDH7A1Aldehyde dehydrogenase 7 family, member A1
1556841_a_at2.33ALDH1L2Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family, member L2
231202_at55.15ALDH1L2Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family, member L2
201612_at2.06ALDH9A1Aldehyde dehydrogenase 9 family, member A1
a
bHLH, basic helix-loop-helix.

Reconstituted humanized mammary fat pads produce milk after pregnancy and delivery.

To show the active status of the reconstituted humanized mammary glands with the mammary stem cells generated in vitro with IL-8-treated luminal cells, the females bearing these cells in their mammary fat pads 4 and 5 were mated. When the females were pregnant, all nipples but 4 and 5 were cauterized and removed, and delivery occurred after 3 weeks of pregnancy. Figure 11A shows milk in the mammary gland. Reconstituted fat pads used for lactation were subjected to carmine whole-mount staining, which showed highly developed mammary outgrowth (Fig. 11B). Interestingly, milk spots were observed in the pups’ stomachs the second day after birth (Fig. 11C). To confirm the human nature of the milk, fluorescent immunostaining was performed using specific anti-human casein antibody. Figure 11D shows strong casein staining on the fat pad obtained from the lactating animal compared to that obtained from the virgin one. This confirmed that the generated milk was produced by human cells and that IL-8-generated mammary stem cells can regenerate functional mammary glands in an animal model.
FIG 11
FIG 11 Reconstituted humanized mammary fat pads produce milk after pregnancy and delivery. IL-8-generated mammospheres were injected into cleared mouse fat pads (nipples 4 and 5); at 6 weeks posttransplantation, these females were mated; and when the females were pregnant, all nipples but 4 and 5 were cauterized and removed. Delivery occurred after 3 weeks of pregnancy. (A) Image showing the presence of milk in a reconstituted fat pad. (B) Reconstituted fat pads used for lactation were also subjected to carmine whole-mount staining. (C) Pups with milk spots in their stomachs. (D) Mammary glands were collected postdelivery and also from virgin mouse and subjected to immunohistochemistry on FFPE tissues using human-specific anticasein antibody.

DISCUSSION

After showing that senescent luminal cells can transactivate breast stromal fibroblasts in an IL-8-dependent manner and that these cells secrete high levels of IL-8 and have procarcinogenic potential (12), we decided to elucidate the effects of IL-8- and senescent luminal cell (SLC)-dependent active breast stromal fibroblasts on their adjacent normal luminal cells. Intriguingly, breast myofibroblasts as well as IL-8 dedifferentiated normal luminal cells to multipotent mammary stem cells with a long-term mammary gland-reconstituting ability. These cells exhibited all the cellular and molecular features of mammary stem cells, including the gene expression pattern; self-renewal; differentiation into luminal, myoepithelial, and bipotent cells; and the formation of branching structures both in vitro and in vivo, when they were injected into cleared mouse mammary fat pads. Furthermore, luminal and myoepithelial cells produced by the differentiation in vitro of the obtained IL-8-related mammospheres exhibited gene expression patterns identical to those of the initial/parental luminal cells and their counterpart myoepithelial cells, respectively. Interestingly, the mammary stem cells generated in vitro reconstituted functional humanized mammary glands, which produced milk postdelivery. This paradigm may be applied to other epithelial cells, and since the process does not need any genetic alteration, the resulting stem cells could be safely utilized for autologous regenerative therapies.
Similarly, Poli et al. have recently shown the role of MYC overexpression in dedifferentiating human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized human mammary epithelial cells into stem cell-like cells (22). Moreover, dedifferentiation of murine mammary luminal cells has been previously obtained upon the transient coexpression of Slug and Sox9, which converted them into long-term-repopulating mammary stem cells (15). In another study, Panciera et al. found that the transient expression of YAP/TAZ converted primary differentiated mouse cells to tissue-specific stem/progenitor cells (23). Furthermore, it was recently shown that transient exposure of primary mouse keratinocytes to senescence-associated secretions enhanced plasticity and stemness in these cells (10). Moreover, Schwitalla et al. showed that constitutive activation of β-catenin dedifferentiates intestinal epithelial cells into crypt stem cells (24). These findings indicate that differentiated luminal cells can be reprogrammed and regain stem cell properties through significant plasticity in the epithelial cell hierarchy.
At the molecular level, we have shown that IL-8-dependent MaSC formation is mediated through STAT3 activation and miR-141 downregulation. In fact, while IL-8 is a well-known activator of STAT3 signaling, the repression of miR-141 could be mediated through AUF1 upregulation and consequent p16 repression. Indeed, we have previously shown that p16, which is negatively regulated by AUF1, positively controls miR-141 (18, 19). Moreover, AUF1 is a direct target of the STAT3 transcription factor (20). Interestingly, our findings indicate that IL-8 downregulates miR-141 through STAT3/AUF1/p16 signaling (Fig. 8 and 9). miR-141 belongs to the miR-200 family, which has been shown to be associated with EMT and stemness through the negative regulation of ZEB1 and ZEB2, two major EMT proteins (25, 26). Furthermore, the stem cell proteins CD44 and EZH2 were shown to be direct and functionally relevant targets of miR-141, which also positively controls the expression of several epithelial genes, while it represses numerous mesenchymal genes (27). In addition to STAT3, IL-8 activates other signaling pathways, such as the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and RAS/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways (13), which may also be involved in the IL-8-dependent dedifferentiation of luminal cells.
The present findings also show that IL-8 plays major roles in the cross talk between breast epithelial and stromal cells. In addition to senescence, IL-8 can be activated by several other forms of physiological and physical signaling, including inflammatory signals, reactive oxygen species, radiation, and hypoxia (28). Furthermore, accumulating evidence shows that IL-8 plays a critical role in EMT and is a key regulator of breast cancer stem cell (CSC) activity (2933). The possible IL-8-dependent dedifferentiation of luminal cells into multipotent stem cells suggests the potential accumulation of mammary stem cells with a proliferative capacity in response to inflammation and stress as well as during aging. As a case in point, Garbe et al. have shown the accumulation of multipotent progenitors during the aging of human mammary epithelia (7). Similarly, Dong et al. have recently shown an age-associated increase in MaSC frequency in mouse mammary glands (6). Both reports described a decline in the function and an increased transformation potential of MaSC with aging. Other groups have also shown that senescence-associated secretions promote in vivo reprogramming and enhance the regenerative capacity (10, 34, 35). This suggests that the accumulation of MaSC, which might be more susceptible to mutagenesis and transformation in a procarcinogenic niche, could constitute an important step during breast carcinogenesis. Furthermore, IL-8 may also be part of a procarcinogenic niche that can reprogram noncancer stem cells to cancer stem cells, which could be a great source of tumor heterogeneity. This plasticity was recently shown in 2 studies, which indicated that the introduction of a PIK3CAH1047R mutation in basally or luminally restricted mammary cells triggered lineage plasticity and cell expansion during tumorigenesis in mice (36, 37). These findings suggest that non-CSC can acquire CSC-like features either as a result of genetic/epigenetic changes or in a microenvironment-dependent manner (38, 39). Thereby, heterogeneity in tumors does not need to arise from the transformation of a cell with multipotent potential but could be a natural consequence of oncogene activation, stress, or mutation, regardless of the cell of origin, which could be a multipotent stem cell, a luminal unipotent stem/progenitor cell, or a mature luminal lineage-restricted cell (36).
In conclusion, our study shows that senescence-related active breast stromal fibroblasts as well as IL-8 promote the dedifferentiation of breast luminal cells into multipotent mammary stem cells capable of generating functional mammary glands. Thereby, these MaSC generated in vitro by IL-8 treatment clearly show the plasticity of these cells and could be of great cosmetic/therapeutic value as well as a precious tool for biomedical research and drug development.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Normal breast tissue processing and cell preparation.

Breast tissues were collected from subjects who underwent reduction mammoplasty according to the guidelines of the Ethics Committee of the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSHRC) (approval RAC 2140017). Informed consent was obtained from all subjects. Luminal cells and fibroblast cells were purified through 2 sorting steps as previously described (12).

Cell culture and reagents.

Primary breast fibroblast cells (NBF-10, NBF-20, NBF-21, and NBF-34) and luminal epithelial cells (NBL-10 and NBL-34) were obtained from females who underwent reduction mammoplasty and then cultured using fibroblast growth medium (M-199 and F-12 media at a 1:1 ratio, supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% antibiotic and antimycotic [Gibco, NY]) and luminal growth medium (Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium [DMEM]–F-12 medium supplemented with 2% fetal bovine serum, human mammary epithelial cell (HuMEC) supplement [Gibco], bovine pituitary extract [Gibco], and 1% antibiotic and antimycotic), respectively, as previously described (40). Human full-length IL-8 recombinant protein (P01) (Abnova Corporation, Taoyuan City, Taiwan) (sequence, MTSKLAVALLAAFLISAALCEGAVLPRSAKELRCQCIKTYSKPFHPKFIKELRVIESGPHCANTEIIVKLSDGRELCLDPKENWVQRVVEKFLKRAENS), human truncated IL-8 recombinant protein (GenBank accession number P10145) (Abcam, MA) (sequence, AVLPRSAKELRCQCIKTYSKPFHPKFIKELRVIESGPHCANTEIIVKLSDGRELCLDPKENWVQRVVEKFLKRAENS), and human full-length IL-6 recombinant protein (hBA-184) (Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Inc.) were used.

Mammosphere culture.

Single cells were first passed through a 40-μm sieve and plated in ultra-low-attachment 6-well plates at densities of 20,000 viable cells/ml in primary culture and 1,000 cells/ml in passages (to assess the self-renewal capacity). Cells were grown in serum-free mammosphere-specific medium (mammary epithelial cell basal medium [MEBM]) (Lonza, NJ) supplemented with 2% B27, 20 ng/ml epidermal growth factor (EGF), 500 ng/ml hydrocortisone, and 5 μg/ml insulin (all from Gibco). Mammospheres were collected by gentle centrifugation (800 rpm) after 7 to 10 days and dissociated enzymatically (10 min in a 1:1 mixture of 0.05% trypsin, 0.53 mM EDTA, and TrypLE). The cells obtained by dissociation were sieved through a 40-μm sieve and analyzed microscopically for single cellularity.

Reconstitution of human mammary glands in a mouse model.

Animal experiments were approved by the KFSHRC institutional animal care and use committee (ACUC) under RAC proposal number 2090027 and were conducted according to guidelines in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, 8th edition (41). Animals were individually housed in a controlled environment (pathogen free) in filter-top cages under 12-h light/dark cycles at 22°C ± 2°C and provided with sterile food and water ad libitum. Experiments for the reconstitution of mammary glands were performed according to the protocol of Proia and Kuperwasser, with slight modifications (42). Immortalized fibroblasts (BP28-tert) (125,000 X-ray-irradiated cells and 125,000 nonirradiated cells) were mixed with different numbers of single cells of YLAF, SLAF, ILAF, or IL-8-treated luminal mammospheres in the presence of Matrigel. Twenty blindly chosen 3-week-old NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J female mice (Jackson Laboratories, CA) were anesthetized, and the junction of blood vessels near the lymph node between the fourth and fifth sets of nipples was cauterized. The fourth inguinal mammary glands were then cleared from the cauterized area, and the mice were then randomized into 4 groups. The cells were injected under the skin of the cleared gland. After 8 weeks of injection, mice were sacrificed, and the reconstituted mammary gland was excised and utilized for whole-mount analysis and immunohistochemistry. For secondary mammary gland reconstitution, primary mammary ductal outgrowths were cut into very small fragments (1 mm each), and each fragment was then reimplanted into cleared mammary fat pads.

Whole-mount staining of mammary glands.

Mammary gland tissue was spread onto a glass slide, fixed with Carnoy’s fixative (6:3:1 mixture of ethanol-chloroform-acetic acid) for 4 h, and stained with carmine alum stain (carmine, aluminum potassium sulfate) overnight.

Conditioned media.

Cells were cultured in medium without serum for 48 h, and the media were then collected and passed through a 0.45-μm filter unit. The resulting supernatants were either used immediately or frozen at −80°C until needed.

Telomerase activity assay.

A telomerase activity assay was performed using a TeloTAGGG telomerase PCR enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) according to the manufacturer’s instructions (Roche, NY). Briefly, 20 μg of heat- or sham-treated cell extracts was amplified by PCR (94°C for 30 s, 50°C for 30 s, and 72°C for 90 s). The PCR products were hybridized to anti-digoxigenin-peroxidase, the ELISA reaction was then performed, and the optical density (OD) was measured at 450 nm on a standard ELISA plate reader (x-Mark; Bio-Rad). These experiments were performed in triplicates.

Mammosphere proliferation.

Mammospheres were digested into single cells, sieved through a 40-μm sieve, and then analyzed microscopically for single cellularity. A total of 1,000 single cells were plated in an ultra-low-attachment 96-well plate (Corning) in stem cell-specific medium and counted weekly upon separation by digestion.

Differentiation.

Single-cell suspensions were plated on 0.1% gelatin-coated plates at a density of 2,000 viable cells/10-cm-diameter dish. Cells were grown in luminal medium, and after 48 h, cell images were captured using a Floid cell imaging station (Life Technologies, NY). Next, differentiated cells were characterized by immunofluorescence or fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis using luminal and myoepithelial markers.

Branching.

To test alveolar differentiation, cells were differentiated as described above, and after 5 days, a layer of Matrigel was added along with prolactin (1 μg/ml). The complex acinar and branched acinar structures that formed after 3 days of plating were imaged using the Floid cell imaging station (Life Technologies).

Microarray analysis.

Total RNA was prepared using the miRNeasy minikit (Qiagen, UK) according to the manufacturer’s instructions and treated with RNase-free DNase. RNA quality and yield were assessed using an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA), and samples yielding an RNA integrity number (RIN) of ≥8 were considered for global expression profiling performed in duplicates for each sample using Affymetrix GeneChip human genome U133 plus 2.0 arrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Briefly, 200 ng of RNA was reverse transcribed to synthesize first-strand cDNA with the help of oligo(dT) primers containing a T7 flanking sequence. Following second-strand synthesis, the in vitro transcription step reaction was carried out with labeled amplified RNA (aRNA). Following purification and fragmentation of aRNA, the samples were hybridized overnight onto U133 plus 2.0 human genome arrays. Finally, after washing to remove the unbound transcripts, the hybridized microarrays were scanned, and intensity (cel) files with the acquisition and initial quantification of array images were generated using Transcriptome Analysis Console (TAC) (Applied Biosystems, NY). Robust multichip average (RMA) analysis for quality control was used to filter and eliminate genes displaying an averaged intensity inferior to the global array background. Significantly modulated genes were defined as those with an absolute fold change (FC) of >2 and an adjusted P value of <0.05, while one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to calculate the P values between the two groups. The identification of differentially expressed genes was achieved by using scatterplots and hierarchical clustering analysis. P values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

Cellular lysate preparation and immunoblotting.

Cellular lysate preparation and immunoblotting were performed as previously described (43). Antibodies are listed in Table 2.
TABLE 2
TABLE 2 Antibodies utilized for immunoblot, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry analyses
Antibody (clone)aSource
Anti-Twist1 (10E4E6)Abcam
Anti-Snail (C15D3)Cell Signaling Technology
Anti-Slug (1G7)Abcam
Antivimentin (RV202)Abcam
Anti-ZEB1 (4C4)Abnova Corporation
Anti-ALDH1/2 (H-85)Santa Cruz Biotechnology
Anti-CD24 (C-20)Santa Cruz Biotechnology
Anti-GAPDH (14C10)Cell Signaling Technology
Anti-E-cadherin (24E10)Cell Signaling Technology
Anti-N-cadherin (D4R1H) XPCell Signaling Technology
Anti-Nanog (D73G4) XPCell Signaling Technology
Anti-OCT-4 (C30A3)Cell Signaling Technology
Anti-KLF-4 (D1F2)Cell Signaling Technology
Anti-Sox2 (D6D9) XPCell Signaling Technology
Anti-Bmi1 (D20B7) XPCell Signaling Technology
Anti-Stat3 (124H6)Cell Signaling Technology
Anti-P-Stat3 (Tyr705) (D3A7)Cell Signaling Technology
Anti-EpCAM (D1B3)Cell Signaling Technology
Anti-CD44Sigma-Aldrich
Anti-AUF1 (hnRNPD/AUF1)Abcam
Anti-p16BD Biosciences
Anti-mouse IgG, HRP conjugatePromega
Anti-rabbit IgG, HRP conjugatePromega
Donkey anti-goat IgG, HRP conjugatePromega
Anti-cytokeratin 14 (LL002)Abcam
Anti-cytokeratin 19 (EP1580Y)Abcam
Anti-cytokeratin 18 (DC 10)Abcam
Anticasein (F20.14)Abcam
Alexa Fluor 594–goat anti-rabbit IgGLife Technologies
Alexa Fluor 488–goat anti-mouse IgGLife Technologies
FITC–mouse anti-CD90BD Biosciences
Anti-CD326 (EpCAM)-APCMiltenyi Biotec
PE-Cy7–mouse anti-human CD10BD Biosciences
APC-Cy7–anti-mouse/human CD44BioLegend
FITC–mouse anti-CD24BD Biosciences
PE–rat anti-CD49BD Biosciences
FITC–mouse anti-MUC-1BD Biosciences
a
HRP, horseradish peroxidase; FITC, fluorescein isothiocyanate; APC, allophycocyanin; PE, phycoerythrin.

Immunofluorescence.

Cells and mammospheres were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde for 10 min, permeabilized with 0.2% Triton X-100 for 10 min, and quenched in 100 mM glycine for 10 min at room temperature. Cells were then blocked in 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and incubated with the primary antibody. Cells were then washed and incubated with Alexa Fluor 594- and 488-conjugated antibodies, respectively. Nuclei were stained with DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole), and images were captured using the Floid cell imaging station (Life Technologies). Antibodies are listed in Table 2.

Cell migration, invasion, and proliferation.

Cell migration and invasion were assessed according to the manufacturer’s instructions. In brief, 1 × 104 cells in serum-free medium were added to the upper wells of the cell invasion/migration (CIM) plate with (for invasion) or without (for migration) a thin layer of Matrigel basement membrane matrix, and complete medium was added to the lower chamber wells as a chemoattractant. Subsequently, the plates were incubated in the real-time cell analyzer (RTCA) system for 24 h, and the impedance value of each well was automatically monitored by the xCELLigence system and expressed as a cell index (CI) value, which represents cell status based on the measured electrical impedance change divided by the background value. Each assay was performed in triplicate.
For the proliferation assay, exponentially growing cells were seeded in an E-plate (1 × 104 cells) with complete medium according to the manufacturer’s instructions. All data were recorded and analyzed by using RTCA software. The CI was used to measure the change in the electrical impedance divided by the background value to represent cell status. Each assay was performed in triplicate.

Flow cytometry.

Cells were incubated for 30 min on ice with directly labeled antibodies. Cells were then washed with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), followed by fixation in 0.5% paraformaldehyde in PBS. Data were acquired using an LSR II flow cytometer using BD FACSDiva operating software. Positive staining was considered based on the negativity of an isotype control. A minimum of 10,000 events were recorded for all samples. Antibodies are listed in Table 2.

siRNA transfection/viral infection.

Two different sequences for STAT3 siRNAs were utilized: Signal Silence STAT3 siRNA and control siRNA were obtained from Cell Signaling Technology. Another one was obtained from Ambion (catalog number s745), with the sequence GCA CCU UCC UGC UAA GAU UTT AAU CUU AGC AGG AAG GUG CCT. The transfections were carried out using the High Perfect reagent (Qiagen) as recommended by the manufacturer.
pLKO.1-miRZip141 (inhibitor of miR-141), pCDH-miR-141 (expressing pre-miR-141) (System Biosciences, CA), and the corresponding control plasmids were used at 1 μg/ml each for the transfection of 293FT cells. Lentiviral supernatants were collected at 48 h posttransfection. Culture media were removed from the target cells and replaced with the lentiviral supernatant, and the mixture was incubated for 24 h in the presence of 1 μg/ml Polybrene (Sigma-Aldrich).

RNA purification and qRT-PCR.

Total RNA containing miRNAs was purified using the miRNeasy minikit (Qiagen, UK) according to the manufacturer’s instructions and treated with RNase-free DNase. One microgram of RNA was used to synthesize cDNA by utilizing either an Advantage RT-PCR kit (Clontech Laboratories, Mountain View, CA) or a miScript II RT kit (Qiagen, UK) for mature miRNAs. qRT-PCR was performed in triplicate using 4 μl of cDNA mixed with 2× FastStart essential DNA green quantitative PCR (qPCR) master mix (Roche, New York, NY) and 0.3 μM forward and reverse primers. Amplifications were performed by utilizing the LightCycler 96 real-time PCR detection system (Roche) under the following cycle conditions: 95°C for 10 min (1 cycle) followed by 95°C for 10 s, 59°C for 20 s, and 72°C for 30 s (45 cycles). Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) expression levels were used for normalization, and gene expression differences were calculated using the threshold cycle (CT). The obtained values were plotted as means ± standard deviations (SD). Three independent experiments were performed for each reaction. (See Table 3 for the sequences of the primers used.)
TABLE 3
TABLE 3 Sequences of the primers utilized for qRT-PCR
PrimeraSequence
GAPDH F5′-GAGTCCACTGGCGTCTTC-3′
GAPDH R5′-GGGGTGCTAAGCAGTTGGT-3′
 
E-cadherin F5′-CCA GAA ACG GAG GCC TGA T-3′
E-cadherin R5′-CTG GGA CTC CAC CTA CAG AAA GTT-3′
 
N-cadherin F5′-CCT CCA GAG TTT ACT GCC ATG AC-3′
N-cadherin R5′-GTA GGA TCT CCG CCA CTG ATT C-3′
 
vimentin F5′-TTC CAA ACT TTT CCT CCC TGA ACC-3′
vimentin R5′-TCA AGG TCA TCG TGA TGC TGA G-3′
 
ZEB1 F5′-GGC AGA GAA TGA GGG AGA AG-3′
ZEB1 R5′-CTT CAG ACA CTT GCT CAC TAC TC-3′
 
Twist1 F5′-GGA CAA GCT GAG CAA GAT TCA GA-3′
Twist1 R5′-GTG AGC CAC ATA GCT GCA G-3′
 
Snail F5′-CCT CAA GAT GCA CAT CCG AAG-3′
Snail R5′-ACA TGG CCT TGT AGC AGC CA-3′
 
Slug F5′-CCC ACA CAT TAC CTT GTG TTT GCA A-3′
Slug R5′-CAA ATG CTC TGT TGC AGT GAG G-3′
 
CD24 F5′-CAC GCA GAT TTA TTC CAG TGA AAC-3′
CD24 R5′-GAC CAC GAA GAG ACT GGC TGT T-3′
 
CD44 F5′-CCA GAA GGA ACA GTG GTT TGG C-3′
CD44 R5′-ACT GTC CTC TGG GCT TGG TGT T-3′
 
ALDH1A2 F5′-GAG TAA CTC TGG AAC TTG GAG GC-3′
ALDH1A2 R5′-ATG GAC TCC TCC ACG AAG ATG C-3′
 
CDKN2A F5′-CAA CGC ACC GAA TAG TTA CG-3′
CDKN2A R5′-CAG CTC CTC AGC CAG GTC-3′
 
Mature miR-141UAACACUGUCUGGUAAAGAUGG
a
F, forward; R, reverse.

3D scaffold culture.

An Alvatex scaffold was utilized, according to the manufacturer’s instructions (Amsbio, MA), to allow the formation of multilayered high-density cell populations. NBL-10 cells were seeded at 1 × 106 cells per well prior to exposure to either SFM, SFM containing IL-8 (25 ng), or SFCM from SLAF or ILAF for 24 h. Cultures were maintained in growing medium for 2 weeks. The discs were then fixed in 10% formalin, paraffin embedded, sectioned, and utilized for either hematoxylin and eosin staining or immunofluorescence.

Immunohistochemistry.

Immunohistochemistry was done on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue as previously described (44), using specific antibodies overnight at a dilution of 1:500. Color was developed with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB), and instant hematoxylin was used for counterstaining.

Statistical analysis.

Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t test, and two-sided P values of ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. For microarray experiments, ANOVA was utilized for statistical analysis.

Data availability.

Protein quantification and mammosphere sizes were quantified using ImageJ software, FACS profile analysis was performed using BD FACSDiva operating software, and all statistical analyses were performed using GraphPad Prism v5 software.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

We are thankful to the Research Center administration for their continuous help and support.
This work was supported by the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre under RAC proposal 2090027.

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cover image Molecular and Cellular Biology
Molecular and Cellular Biology
Volume 40Number 913 April 2020
eLocator: e00508-19
PubMed: 32015100

History

Received: 16 October 2019
Returned for modification: 25 November 2019
Accepted: 2 January 2020
Published online: 13 April 2020

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Keywords

  1. IL-8
  2. STAT3
  3. cell differentiation
  4. stem cells

Contributors

Authors

Huda H. Al-Khalaf
Department of Molecular Oncology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
The National Center for Biotechnology, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
KACST-BWH/Harvard Center of Excellence for Biomedicine, Joint Centers of Excellence Program, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Hazem Ghebeh
Stem Cell and Tissue Re-engineering Program, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Salma M. Wakil
Department of Genetics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Falah Al-Mohanna
Department of Comparative Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Abdelilah Aboussekhra
Department of Molecular Oncology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Notes

Address correspondence to Abdelilah Aboussekhra, [email protected].

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